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Tommy, I cherish traveling with you on Saturday mornings. ❤️. It’s an unknown journey at the start and by the end I’m relishing the experience. Thank you for allowing us to be with you through your writing.

Today I thought this to be particularly beautiful:

“While seeing new countries has taught me about the inexhaustible variety of life and unity of the human experience—how all people love and cry, laugh and eat, worry and die—the same education can be found at home, if I choose to look at what I had previously only seen.”

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Thank you James. I’m not sure if it made the most interesting essay but it’s a question I get asked often. Perhaps more interesting would be how I’ve learned to travel but alas, maybe another time.

Unknown journey for sure. I’m certainly learning the necessity of a friendship with the unknown. Although I hope once we’re friends it’ll stop bugging me so much to hang out. We shall see.

Thank you for all your kindness & consistency. It keeps me going.

Hope you’re having a lovely week (:

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Thanks, Tommy. This is a great piece and definitely pulls at my heartstrings.

"I could become a full-grown man, but never grow up."

Ain't that the truth, eh? Sometimes I wonder about myself.

I travelled from west-coast Canada to South-east Asia back in 1990 - when I was 20 years old - and spent 6 months backpacking across Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, and Indonesia. I fell in love with the region and the people.

Growing up in a town of 60 people, the sheer mass of humanity, and differences in culture, religion, and ways of living changed my way of thinking - and my path in life.

If you are in Phuket, head north, up the Andaman coast, through Phangnga and to Ranong province. This is my favourite part of Thailand - snuggled right up against the Myanmar border. Koh Phayam is like the "old Thailand" - laid back and quiet. I spent 5 years living and working in Bangkok with my family (2017-2022 - yes, during Covid) and our favourite places to visit were/are Phangnga and Ranong.

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John! Thank you for reading & the kind words.

I was going to dive more into why our culture suffers without rituals and rites of passage - but it’s over my head and not the type of “change the world but I’m not gonna tell you how” writing I want to put energy into.

So cool you also traveled Asia in your young 20’s. I’m sure it must have been quite the adventure - especially then without much of the tourist infrastructure and globalization. Unfortunately you can live in Phuket while still being in America, if that makes sense.

I’ll add your suggestions to my travel notes, either for this trip or one in the future!

Thanks again & I really appreciate your insights here (:

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Great perspective, thanks Tommy.

It seems that every time I leave the comfort of my own home I contemplate the same questions, and though I haven’t settled on an answer, I agree with the embracement of discomfort and the avoidance of complacency.

I also find myself longing for some sort of sub-journey. Leaving home is step one of the journey, and it seems that when I land elsewhere I still need something to channel my energy toward. Walking the streets of over-toured cities doesn’t cut it for me. Maybe something else, like exploring foreign wilderness, staying at a surf hostel, or committing to other lessons of strong cultural identity.

It seems that, on your travels, you have committed tons of time to specific purpose, such as reading and writing, and (indirect or direct) personal development. Would you agree? How do these purposeful activities weigh into your reasons for travel?

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Evan! Thanks for the note man. I remember you were going to Uruguay (if I’m not wrong?) - hope the trip has been fun & safe

I think you hit on a great point which is the trial & error of travelling. It took me few trips to realize euphoria didn’t exist on the other side of the Atlantic. And another few trips to find a style of travel I find meaningful—often slower, longer stays, more time to immerse myself in a place, less touristy destinations and fewer days in transport. But I’m still learning with each trip.

Although even if the trip doesn’t pan out to be everything it could be, there’s still value in leaving home. In facing discomfort. The unknown. People who face the unknown become bigger than those who don’t.

I’d say I have to incorporate reading & writing for a few hours every day into my travels because I can’t really live without it. So this has helped lead me towards slow travel.

Thanks again man & hope all is well

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I travel because it makes me happy…travel with the sense of wonder…by discovering new places and people, you discover yourself…coming back from a trip you are never the same person again… going back to the same countries is when the discovery really starts…that sunset photo is surreal!

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Ah that’s so good - beautiful summary of travel. Thank you for reading & the thoughtful note (:

I’ve heard something similar - you can only really discover a place after a few visits.

Hope you have a lovely week

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I thoroughly enjoyed this and love your perspective.

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Thanks Sul (: means a lot coming from a well travelled fellow like yourself

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we travel to grow

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exactly kora, exactly

Thank you for reading man - appreciate ya

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beautiful! have felt similar thoughts in the past and this is a lovely post. v inspiring, makes me want to flesh out my thoughts around travel and my relationship with it as well!

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Thanks Mallika!! Really appreciate you reading & the kind words. made my day

One of the reasons I wrote this piece was because it’s a question I got often & something people always didn’t understand.

Definitely write a piece about travel if it’s on your mind! And let me know so I can check it out (:

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Love this. So true-we have to force ourselves outside of what’s comfortable. Very deep. Your articles always make me think and give me a different way of looking at things. Thanks for sharing your talent and thoughts with us.

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Thanks Emily (: appreciate you reading & taking the time to leave a kind note.

It’s definitely a simple idea - that doing what’s uncomfortable makes you a bigger person - but the funny thing I’ve discovered about discomfort (similar to loneliness) is that it’s very uncomfortable in the moment and every cell of my body wants to run away.

Still learning in progress.

Hope you’re having a lovely week (:

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Nicely done, TD

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Thanks BB (: appreciate you taking the time

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I understand your reason well, and it seems quite in line with my own.

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Thank you Ulrich (: appreciate you taking the time to read

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Loved this :) … of course anything on travel I’m interested to hear but this is a great perspective. Travel can be so many things but unfortunately, as you point out, I think so many people do it wrong and for the wrong reasons. Very easy to see when you stay in a hostel from overhearing conversations and witnessing interactions. I love that you know why you travel and are listening to your internal compass, not what’s popular with your peers. Great essay as always, I anticipate these writings with excitement every week!

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Thanks Jack (: you can definitely sense a certain restlessness of people in hostels, living slightly out in front of their feet, already onto the next place

But travel isn’t one size fits all and it takes a while to find what works - lots of patience, trial & error

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I love your writing Tommy. I decided to start traveling because I couldn’t remember what my life consisted of in the months, weeks or even days prior. My life had turned into a single monotonous memory that kept replaying over and over. I find that the discomfort that comes with traveling forces you to snap out of autopilot. I’d much rather live uncomfortable than not live at all.

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Brandon! Thanks so much for reading & the insightful note you left here.

I loved this: “I’d much rather live uncomfortable than not live at all.”

And you’re so right on autopilot. It’s easy to get comfortable at home, falling into the same rhythms, not pushing yourself. The interesting lesson I’ve learned too is that habits are so malleable with place. So everytime I change location, I have a completely new opportunity to create good habits and my ideal day.

Thanks again & hope you have an awesome week (:

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Feb 25Liked by Tommy Dixon

‘I could become a full grown man, but never grow up.’

Common sense is most uncommon!

Great comment, James. I wish you well.

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Feb 25Liked by Tommy Dixon

Tommy! Living the dream in Thailand and beyond. There has to be some Irish dna in the Dixon clan. Travelling is part of our culture. A lot of us never came back!😂This piece reveals a little more of you and your urge to mature into a man that will leave his mark on the world. Your family must be very proud of you. Great insights are always on display in your writings, Tommy. Even more so today. As I said when we first Metin Substack, I fire on all cylinders when travelling. Sounds like you are doing the same, and getting Olympian standard fit in the process!! Inspirational, my friend. I’m

The road less traveled

Offers sunsets seldom seen

Weighed down with our past

Fear of the future

Sees the now is missed

Know what I mean

Keep going Tommy.

This was a remarkable read. 👏✍️

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Haha thanks so much Kevin! Your comments consistently bring a smile to my face with your lightness & kindness. I certainly do have Irish DNA on both my Mom’s & Dad’s side. Not sure where specifically in Ireland unfortunately.

Part of the reason I wrote this was because my parents didn’t always understand why I didn’t want to travel always with my older brother or with them when I could; why I wanted to go alone. Especially as I’m the youngest child I really feel the need to be out on my own, with no one to solve my problems or do everything for me. Independence, I suppose.

This is something I tried to explain to both of them before in conversation—and friends as well who travel more as a party—and wanted to get it in written form.

Thanks again my friend! Appreciate all your support (:

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